Monday, 22 July 2013

Is love ever wasted?

On the day when it seems the whole world is rejoicing at the news of Kate and William's new born baby born, it's perhaps not inappropriate to stop and think about those parents who today may have received more difficult news about their baby.

Today I read an article in the journal of the Christan Medical Fellowship. It was about baby Millie who was born to consultant oncologist Martin Scott-Brown and his wife Frances.  Millie had life shortening abnormalities of her brain and facial development. Earlier in the pregnancy the parents were given the option of termination, with the comment that, '98% of parents in your position would terminate the pregnancy'. Their's was no easy decision, but was helped by an apparent chance meeting with someone who recommended a book (The shaming of the strong by Sarah Williams, a parent who had been in a similar position), which brought hope and clarity to their situation. They began to see their future daughter, 'who had been given to us by God, not as a medical problem to be faced, but a daughter, however imperfect to be treasure and loved'.

At Millie's funeral her grandad made reference to Mary Magdelene, who had washed Jesus' feet with her hair and had gone on to lavish her seemingly priceless perfume on him, much to the chagrin and criticism of those present. What a waste! Was the near universal cry-although such sentiment was far from Jesus' lips.

Love is not a currency like money. Economics shouldn't come into it. Love is something freely given.     Indeed St Paul tells us that love bears all things and hopes all thngs (1 Cor 13.7). If God had waited for me to be worth loving, it would be an extremely long and fruitless wait. Jesus demonstrated extraordinary love for all and sundry when he walked the earth, and today, every now and then we get a further glimpse of what God's love is like. As Martin and Frances Scott-Brown 'wasted' 2 years of their life loving Millie, so they experienced the grace of God in their lives, humbling them and yet increasing their capacity to love. Their's is a beautiful story simply and powerfully told. In no way is it a criticism of ofhers who may have made other choices.

Do read the article here, http://www.cmf.org.uk/publications/content.asp?context=article&id=26067
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